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Arthroscopy 

Arthroscopy (ahr-THROS-kuh-pee) is a procedure for diagnosing and treating joint problems. A surgeon inserts a narrow tube attached to a fiber-optic video camera through a small incision — about the size of a buttonhole. The view inside your joint is transmitted to a high-definition video monitor.


Why it's done

Doctors use arthroscopy to help diagnose and treat a variety of joint conditions, most commonly those affecting the:

  • Knee
  • Shoulder
  • Elbow
  • Ankle
  • Hip
  • Wrist

Risks

Arthroscopy is a very safe procedure and complications are uncommon. Problems may include:

  • Tissue or nerve damage. The placement and movement of the instruments within the joint can damage the joint's structures.
  • Infection. Any type of invasive surgery carries a risk of infection.
  • Blood clots. Rarely, procedures that last longer than an hour can increase the risk of blood clots developing in your legs or lungs.



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