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Ovarian Cyst Removal

Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled sacs or pockets in an ovary or on its surface. Women have two ovaries — each about the size and shape of an almond — on each side of the uterus. Eggs (ova), which develop and mature in the ovaries, are released in monthly cycles during the childbearing years.

Many women have ovarian cysts at some time. Most ovarian cysts present little or no discomfort and are harmless. The majority disappears without treatment within a few months.

However, ovarian cysts — especially those that have ruptured — can cause serious symptoms. To protect your health, get regular pelvic exams and know the symptoms that can signal a potentially serious problem.

Most ovarian cysts are harmless and go away on their own. But you may need surgery to remove a cyst if it’s causing you pain or discomfort, or if it could be cancerous.

Ovarian cysts are usually removed using a surgical procedure called laparoscopy (a type of keyhole surgery), but you may need open surgery if the cysts are large.


Causes of Ovarian Cyst Removal

Most ovarian cysts develop as a result of your menstrual cycle (functional cysts). Other types of cysts are much less common.

Functional cysts

Your ovaries normally grow cyst-like structures called follicles each month. Follicles produce the hormones estrogen and progesterone and release an egg when you ovulate.

If a normal monthly follicle keeps growing, it's known as a functional cyst. There are two types of functional cysts:

  • Follicular cyst. Around the midpoint of your menstrual cycle, an egg bursts out of its follicle and travels down the fallopian tube. A follicular cyst begins when the follicle doesn't rupture or release its egg, but continues to grow.
  • Corpus luteum cyst. When a follicle releases its egg, it begins producing estrogen and progesterone for conception. This follicle is now called the corpus luteum. Sometimes, fluid accumulates inside the follicle, causing the corpus luteum to grow into a cyst.

Functional cysts are usually harmless, rarely cause pain, and often disappear on their own within two or three menstrual cycles.

Other cysts

Types of cysts not related to the normal function of your menstrual cycle include:

  • Dermoid cysts. Also called teratomas, these can contain tissue, such as hair, skin or teeth, because they form from embryonic cells. They're rarely cancerous.
  • Cystadenomas. These develop on the surface of an ovary and might be filled with a watery or a mucous material.
  • Endometriomas. These develop as a result of a condition in which uterine endometrial cells grow outside your uterus (endometriosis). Some of the tissue can attach to your ovary and form a growth.

Dermoid cysts and cystadenomas can become large, causing the ovary to move out of position. This increases the chance of painful twisting of your ovary, called ovarian torsion. Ovarian torsion may also result in decreasing or stopping blood flow to the ovary.


Preparing for Ovarian Cyst Removal

Your surgeon will explain how to prepare for your operation. If you smoke, for example, you’ll be asked to stop. Smoking increases your risk of getting an infection after surgery, which can slow down your recovery. It can also lead to complications.

Ovarian cysts are usually removed by keyhole surgery as a day-case procedure. This means you can go home on the same day. The operation is done under general anaesthesia. If you have a general anaesthesic, you’ll be asleep during the operation. You’ll be asked to follow fasting instructions. This means not eating or drinking, usually for about six hours, before your surgery. It’s important to follow your anaesthetist’s advice.

You may be asked to wear compression stockings to help prevent blood clots forming in the veins in your legs.

Your surgeon will discuss with you what will happen before, during and after your procedure, including any pain you might have. If you’re unsure about anything, don’t be afraid to ask. No question is too small. It’s important that you feel fully informed so you feel happy to give your consent for the procedure to go ahead. You may be asked to do this by signing a consent form.

Source: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/ovarian-cysts/symptoms-causes/syc-20353405




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