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Breast Lift Surgery

breast lift, also known as mastopexy, raises the breasts by removing excess skin and tightening the surrounding tissue to reshape and support the new breast contour.

New statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons show breast lifts have grown 70% since 2000, outpacing breast implants 2-to-1.

Sometimes the areola becomes enlarged over time, and a breast lift will reduce this as well.

A breast lift can rejuvenate your figure with a breast profile that is more youthful and uplifted. A woman's breasts often change over time, losing their youthful shape and firmness. These changes and loss of skin elasticity can result from:

  • Pregnancy
  • Breastfeeding
  • Weight fluctuations
  • Aging
  • Gravity
  • Heredity

Risks Of Breast Lift Surgery

A breast lift poses various risks, including:

  • Scarring. While scars are permanent, they'll soften and fade within one to two years. Scars from a breast lift can usually be hidden by bras and bathing suits. Rarely, poor healing can cause scars to become thick and wide.
  • Changes in nipple or breast sensation. While sensation typically returns within several weeks, some loss of feeling might be permanent. Erotic sensation typically isn't affected.
  • Irregularities or asymmetry in the shape and size of the breasts. This could occur as a result of changes during the healing process. Also, surgery might not successfully correct pre-existing asymmetry.
  • Partial or total loss of the nipples or areolae. Rarely, the blood supply to the nipple or areola is interrupted during a breast lift. This can damage breast tissue in the area and lead to the partial or total loss of the nipple or areola.
  • Difficulty breast-feeding. While breast-feeding is usually possible after a breast lift, some women might have difficulty producing enough milk.

How you prepare for Breast Lift?

He or she will also consider the quality of your skin tone. Breast skin that has good tone will hold the breasts in a better position after a breast lift. The doctor might also take pictures of your breasts for your medical record.

  • Review your medical history. Be prepared to answer questions about current and past medical conditions. Tell the doctor if you have a family history of breast cancer.

    Share the results of any mammograms or breast biopsies. Talk about any medications you're taking or have taken recently, as well as any surgeries you've had.

  • Do a physical exam. To determine your treatment options, the doctor will examine your breasts — including the position of your nipples and areolae.

  • Discuss your expectations. Explain why you want a breast lift and what you're hoping for in terms of appearance after the procedure. Make sure you understand the risks and benefits, including scarring and changes in nipple or breast sensation.

Source: https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/breast-lift/about/pac-20393218




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