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Cardiac Ablation

Cardiac ablation is a procedure that can correct heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias).

Cardiac ablation works by scarring or destroying tissue in your heart that triggers or sustains an abnormal heart rhythm. In some cases, cardiac ablation prevents abnormal electrical signals from entering your heart and, thus, stops the arrhythmia.

Cardiac ablation usually uses long, flexible tubes (catheters) inserted through a vein or artery in your groin and threaded to your heart to deliver energy in the form of heat or extreme cold to modify the tissues in your heart that cause an arrhythmia.

Cardiac ablation is sometimes done through open-heart surgery, but it's often done using catheters, making the procedure less invasive and shortening recovery times.


Risks

  • Bleeding or infection at the site where your catheter was inserted
  • Damage to your blood vessels where the catheter may have scraped as it traveled to your heart
  • Puncture of your heart
  • Damage to your heart valves
  • Damage to your heart's electrical system, which could worsen your arrhythmia and require a pacemaker to correct
  • Blood clots in your legs or lungs (venous thromboembolism)
  • Stroke or heart attack
  • Narrowing of the veins that carry blood between your lungs and heart (pulmonary vein stenosis)
  • Damage to your kidneys from dye used during the procedure
  • Death in rare cases

After Cardiac Ablation

Following your procedure, you'll be moved to a recovery area to rest quietly for four to six hours to prevent bleeding at your catheter site. Your heartbeat and blood pressure will be monitored continuously to check for complications of the procedure.

Depending on your condition, you may be able to go home the same day as your procedure, or you may need to stay in the hospital. If you go home the same day, plan to have someone else drive you home after your procedure.

You may feel a little sore after your procedure, but the soreness shouldn't last more than a week. You'll usually be able to return to your normal activities within a few days after having cardiac ablation.



FAQ's

Catheter ablation is a minimally invasive procedure in which the doctor advances a flexible thin tube (catheter) through the blood vessels to your heart to ablate (stop) abnormal electrical pathways (signals) in the heart tissue.


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